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APH: Learning Russian Part 1 by TarasTompkin APH: Learning Russian Part 1 by TarasTompkin
So yeah. More basic stuff. As usual, I hope you find it helpful. :3 If any other Russian speakers out there spot any errors, please feel free to inform me so I can make the necessary corrections.

Previous Lesson


I do not own Hetalia- I merely use it as a fun teaching medium. All rights reserved by gospodin Himaruya.

NEXT TUTORIAL: "Russia, Belarus, and Lithuania Teach You Russian Terms of Endearment" and/or "Basic Greetings"

(Bonus points if you managed to guess my OTP so far.)
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:iconbloodvampiregirl:
BloodVampireGirl Featured By Owner May 11, 2014  Hobbyist
Тьфу ты, не буду заморачиваться с англишом, и так сказать можно.
 Отличная работа ^J^
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:iconbloodvampiregirl:
BloodVampireGirl Featured By Owner May 11, 2014  Hobbyist
Wery well ^^
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:iconnorthsaare:
northsaare Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Are the pronouns different when they are used as the subject and object of the sentence? Like the difference between "I" and "me" or "she" and "her"?

I hope you make more! These are really helpful and awesome!
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:icons0lstice-s0ng:
S0lstice-S0ng Featured By Owner 21 hours ago  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Hello, I know this is a two-year-old comment, but I felt like it might be helpful for others to see as well. Yes, in Russian, there are 6 cases for all nouns including pronouns. "Я" may be "меня" in the accusative and genitive or "мне" in the dative and prepositional for example. Cases simply refer to the "job" the noun/pronoun fulfills in the sentence. The nominative deals with the subject of the sentence, and the other five cases deal with all potential object types.
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:icongurt-b-froe:
Gurt-B-Froe Featured By Owner Oct 10, 2012  Hobbyist Artist
I believe that the closest English equivalent to "ты" would be "thou" but I'm not sure...
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:iconegenysh:
Egenysh Featured By Owner Jul 22, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I need to learn English! :D because I know Russian!
This tutorial is cool! Well done))
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:iconiridescent-princess:
Iridescent-Princess Featured By Owner Jul 3, 2012  Hobbyist Digital Artist
When are you going to upload more? D: You're very descriptive and easy to understand! :D

:aww:
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:icontarastompkin:
TarasTompkin Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2012
Ah I'm not really sure. Perhaps someday? I'm kind of juggling work and uni and I didnt really think anyone would be that interested in these
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:iconwarriorxcats:
WarriorXCats Featured By Owner Mar 19, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
This is extremely helpful! So, since non-Slavic names don't translate very well, how would you say a non-Slavic name? Such as, perhaps, Logan?

Oh~ Is your OTP RussiaxLithuania? ^3^
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:icontarastompkin:
TarasTompkin Featured By Owner Mar 20, 2012
Non-Slavic names tend to be translated phonetically in the way that is most appropriate for the language. Many traditional "Slavic" names, for instance, were once originally Greek, and also tweaked for pronunciation.

And yes, RusLit is one of my OTP's. c:
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